Gallery of Fine Art Photography - Atlanta GA

Photography as Propaganda

Photography as Propaganda

Politics and the Utopian Dream

Lumière

The exhibition illustrated how artistic expression and creativity can coexist with photography’s ability to abstract time and space, providing a potent vehicle with which to communicate a point of view.

Whether migrating a nation to a utopian social and economic order or framing public policy debates, the power of the photographic image was used effectively in the 20th Century by both totalitarian and democratic leaders.

This exhibition illustrated its’ power to inform and influence. It reminded us of the future impact potential of imagery to amplify ideas using an array of new electronic technologies.

Including photography by: Boris Ignatovich, Dorothea Lange, Yevgeny Khaldei, Peter Sekaer, Ivan Shagin John Gutmann, Alexandr Ustinov, Rondal Partridge, Max Alpert & Georgi Zelma

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1 week ago
Lumiere

"Andre Kertesz: Postcards From Paris" currently in Chicago until January 17th. The exhibition will be coming to Atlanta and open at the High in February.

André Kertész (1894 -1985). Kertesz was a Hungarian-born photographer distinguished by haunting composition in his photographs and by his early efforts in developing the photo essay.

#lumieregallery #andrekertesz #artistitutechicago #highmuseumofart
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1 week ago
Lumiere

On this day in 1968, American singer and songwriter Johnny Cash recorded the album Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison, in front of an audience of some 2,000 inmates at California's Folsom Prison. Shown here are two images by photographer Al Clayton. The first is a portrait of Cash taken on the set of the Johnny Cash show in Nashville and the second is an image from 1969 at the Cummins Prison in Arkansas. Prison reform was one of many humanitarian issues that Cash championed. More images by Clayton can be found on his Lumiere artist page. www.lumieregallery.net#johnnycash #alclaytonphotography #lumieregallery ... See MoreSee Less

On this day in 1968, American singer and songwriter Johnny Cash recorded the album Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison, in front of an audience of some 2,000 inmates at Californias Folsom Prison. Shown here are two images by photographer Al Clayton. The first is a portrait of Cash taken on the set of the Johnny Cash show in Nashville and the second is an image from 1969 at the Cummins Prison in Arkansas. Prison reform was one of many humanitarian issues that Cash championed. More images by Clayton can be found on his Lumiere artist page. www.lumieregallery.net#johnnycash #alclaytonphotography #lumieregalleryImage attachment
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