Gallery of Fine Art Photography - Atlanta GA

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Before It Disappears – Berenice Abbott

There is a tradition in photography of photographers and photo enthusiasts devoting significant portions of their own careers preserving the work of their artistic heroes whose work was on the verge of extinction. READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

Contemporary master Lee Friedlander discovered, printed and published the evocative French Quarter portraits of E.J. Bellocq. In a stroke of good fortune, photographer Peter Miller moved to tiny Heber Springs, Arkansas, in the 1970s, where he unearthed the neglected portraits of Mike Disfarmer, the town’s studio photographer, who turned out to have been a powerful and unsentimental documentarian of small town life.
Eugene Atget, Paris, 1927

Eugene Atget, Paris, 1927

In recent years, John Maloof discovered and brought to light the incredible archive of Vivian Maier. Though their work is very different, both Disfarmer and Maier were working in a kind of vacuum, never imagining or seeking fame.
Bernice Abbott saved Atget’s Paris archive from oblivion, and in a karmic circle, her own forgotten pictures of Route 1 were brought to light by writers Hank O’Neil and Ron Kurtz decades after they were created.
Abbott documented life along Route 1 from Maine to Florida, but in 1958 she abandoned the project for lack of a publisher. The work, as well as some of her unknown New York photographs, was largely unseen until recently.
Complete information about Abbott’s work, can be found on her Artist Page.

Posted in: Snap Shots

2 thoughts on “Before It Disappears – Berenice Abbott

  1. Kathy Marker says:

    Nice article. When will we see Abbott’s work again?

  2. admin says:

    Thank you Kathy.
    We will be opening Circle of Light, this Saturday September 26th with a nice selection of Abbott’s Route 1 work. I hope you can join us at 11 am for your Opening talk featuring Meg Partridge, Director of the Imogen Cunningham Trust, (via Skype).

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